DAVID BUNN MARTINE - Artist
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  » Sep 19, 2017  




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David Martine
Collection: Native Americans of Long Island - Historic

These original pieces were done in oil on Masonite panel approx. 4’ x 4’ in size.

Shinnecock Indian Man - 18th Century. This is a picture of a Shinnecock/Montauk Indian man at his camp site at twilight. He is dressed in typical Native American clothing of the late 17th and 18th centuries Algonquian/woodlands culture of Long Island during the early years of European contact. His traditional home in the background is made of thatched meadow-grass. Shinnecock Indian Man - Ca. 18th Century #2. It`s been a long day and this Shinnecock Man during the year 1780 is dressed and ready for an evening of social dancing. He is dressed in the typical combination of colonial and native American clothing styles of the period: he wears a medicine bag of fur around his neck, cloth shirt, wool leggings and blanket as well as bead embellished shoulder bandolier and garters, eagle feather fan, deer hair headpiece and carved Algonquian ceremonial club, traditional wigwam dwelling of meadow grass and cattail reeds in the background was the original style of dwelling of the Shinnecock people through the 1830`s as well as plain wooden salt-box style colonial inspired houses. Late Afternoon Rest. It is late after and the young Shinnecock mother is resting after a day of preparing food for the ceremony about to start the next day. The year is 1770 and the baby is in the traditional cradleboard that is carried on the mother`s back as she goes about her daily work. The mother`s dress of trade-cloth is inspired from the European womens clothing of the period and the nickel-silver broaches she obtained through the trade networks of other tribes who specialize in metal work. The Shinnecock homes or wickiups in the background are of two styles one of a grass thatch style similar to the English roofs and the other a more Native American style as well. plus shipping. For more information contact artists.) Shinnecock Ceremony CA - 1750. This picture is a statement about the traditional ancient cultures of the Long Island Indians of the 17th century. The image has references to the traditional cape of turkey feathers and also the traditional spiritual practices. The young Native American girl wearing the cape of feathers is either being honored in a special way or has a great deal of importance because of some experience or family recognition. Morning Prayer At Shinnecock. Shown is a Native American Shinnecock Elder, a medicine man or Powaw of the 17 Century. He wears red ochre face paint, tattoos, fringed and painted deer skin mantle and shell jewelry. He uses an eagle feather fan while he conducts his rituals. In the background is a fisherman who is poling the shallow bays in his one-man dugout canoe (mashue) near the cattail reeds looking for the best locations to post his traps. This would be in what is now Shinnecock Bay on eastern Long Island, New York, 17th century. (The original is an oil on masonite 48x48 mounted on 1x2 pine strip temporary frame. Price is $4500 plus shipping. For more information contact the artist.) Shinnecock Potedaup (Whale) Ceremony - 17th Century. The Powdawe or whale hunt of the ancient Shinnecock/Montauk Algonquian peoples of eastern Long Island was accompanied by prayers, dancing and feasting, appreciation for the gift of Moshup, the Giant, or representative of the Creator. He is depcted the great mashues or dug-out canoes made or tulip-poplar, cedar or oak which were used during the Powdawe or off-shore whale hunt. The dance is a form of `stomp` dance or line-dance in which the dance leader sings with the gourd rattle accompaniment. Also there are vegetables and food offerings for the communal feast of thanksgivig. The tails and fins were considered the most special parts of the whale and were highly prized. The bon-fire or sacred fire was also an ancient part of Native American community ritual. (The original of this painting is an oil on masonite panel mounted on a 1x2 pine temporary frame for hanging. The prise is $4,800 plus shipping. For more information contact artist.) Waukus, the Shinnecock Flute Player And Daughter. Waukus, the Shinnecock flute maker, is testing his instrument to see what kind of sound it makes. Both he and his daugher stand under and arbor of reeds during a Spring afternoon in 1760. Each flute of wood or reed he makes has a different personality and is only used during certain times for certain purposes. The sounds are inspired by the sounds of nature - the winds, the trees, and birds of the forest. His Native American clothing is made of trade-cloth he has received through barter from young apprentices, because of his knowledge of traditional ways. The corn, beans and squash in the wooden carved bowl, were recently harvested and Waukus`s daughter is the leader of a group of women who know all the special customs associated with the planting, cultivation and harvesting of the vegatables for the small Shinnecock clan group. Powdawe -Shinnecock Whale Hunt of the 17 Century. The Powdawe or whale hunt of the Shinnecock/Montauk people of eastern Long Island was an ancient ritual in which drift whales were captured with the mashue or dug-out canoes. The whale or potedaup in the Montauk language,was considered a great spiritual gift from the Creator or the Giant whose name was Moshup. Later this form of whaling was called `off-shore` whaling and the Shinnecock - Montauk people of eastern Long Island taught the early English settlers this means of activity. Pictured whalers in the mashue and wooden flotation devises which would have been attached to the wounded whale. Eastern Long Island Native Americans practiced this Powdawe. (The original of this painting is an oil on masonite panel mounted on a 1x2 pine strip temporary hanging frame. Price is $4700 plus shipping. For more informaton contact the artist.) A Rose Harvest. The year is 1685 and this Shinnecock brother and sister are pausing on their trip to the ceremonial grounds. The sister is collecting roses while her brother practices some of the ceremonial songs that are always sung during the rituals which are similar to the Delaware Bighouse Ceremonies. Here he is shown with a gourd rattle and on the ground is a small water-drum and a rolled hide drum with sticks. The women below begin the food preparations for the feast which always accompanies a public event within Native American culture. Shinnecock Legacy of the Sea. This painting is symbolic of the legacy of Shinnecock - Montauk and Eastern Long Island Native Americans who were whalers, and seamen who saled around the world hunting whales during the height of the whale industry in the United States. It shows two whalers of the 17th century and two the 19th century with their typical garb. Shinnecock Homecoming. This Long Island Shinnecock-Algonquian Indian husband and wife await news from a friend coming in a dug-out canoe from a distant village. This Native American scene is during the 17th century.
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